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Children working in factory They were employed through a middleman who paid them in cash on the street. One of the refugees told Panorama they were poorly treated at the factory. He said: "If anything happens to a Syrian, they will throw him away like a piece of cloth." Image caption Marks and Spencer labels from one factory shown to the Panorama team The youngest worker was 15 years old and he was working more than 12 hours a day ironing clothes before they were shipped to the UK. A spokesperson for Marks and Spencer said the programme's findings were "extremely serious" and "unacceptable to M&S". It is offering permanent legal employment to any Syrians who were employed in the factory. "Ethical trading is fundamental to M&S. All of our suppliers are contractually required to comply with our Global Sourcing Principles, which cover what we expect and require of them and their treatment of workers. "We do not tolerate such breaches of these principles and we will do all we can to ensure that this does not happen again." But critics say the retailers are not doing enough to stop the problems highlighted by Panorama. Danielle McMullan, from the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, says the brands need to understand that they are responsible: "It's not enough to say we didn't know about this, it's not our fault. "They have a responsibility to monitor and to understand where their clothes are being made and what conditions they are being made in." Many clothes are now made in Turkey because it is close to Europe and used to dealing with last-minute orders.

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Corbyn said another national election might be needed to break the deadlock. "It is quite possible there will be an election later this year or early next year and that might be a good thing because we cannot go on with a period of great instability," he told the BBC. Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, one of May's most loyal supporters, said he disagreed with Osborne's description of her as a "dead woman walking" and he expected Conservative lawmakers to rally behind her. Fallon told the BBC that in light of the election result a new approach was needed, welcoming the resignation of her two closest aides Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill, who were perceived by many Conservative lawmakers to be high-handed and secretive. May had called the snap election with a view to increasing the narrow majority she had inherited from her predecessor David Cameron. At the start of the campaign, she was enjoying poll leads of 20 points or more over the main opposition Labour Party. But after a poor campaign and an unexpectedly stiff challenge from Labour, her plan went disastrously wrong. The Conservatives now plan to reach a so-called confidence and supply agreement with the DUP, which would involve it supporting a Conservative minority government on key votes in parliament but not forming a formal coalition. Fallon said the DUP would agree to back the Conservatives on big economic and security issues. He said the parties had a history of friendship, and that did not mean the Conservatives agreed with some of the DUP's more socially conservative positions.